• Enter a MESSENGER at door of HASTINGS

    MESSENGER

    (knocking) My lord, my lord.

    HASTINGS

    (within) Who knocks?

    MESSENGER

    One from the Lord Stanley.

    HASTINGS

    (within) What is ‘t o’clock?

    MESSENGER

    5Upon the stroke of four.
    Enter HASTINGS

    HASTINGS

    Cannot my Lord Stanley sleep these tedious nights?

    MESSENGER

    So it appears by that I have to say.
    First, he commends him to your noble self.

    HASTINGS

    What then?

    MESSENGER

    10Then certifies your Lordship that this night
    He dreamt the boar had razèd his helm
    Besides, he says there are two councils kept,
    And that may be determined at the one
    Which may make you and him to rue at th' other.
    15Therefore he sends to know your Lordship’s pleasure,
    If you will presently take horse with him
    And with all speed post with him toward the north
    To shun the danger that his soul divines.
  • A MESSENGER enters and goes to Hastings’s door.

    MESSENGER

    (knocking) My lord, my lord.

    HASTINGS

    (offstage) Who’s knocking?

    MESSENGER

    A messenger from Lord Stanley.

    HASTINGS

    (offstage)What time is it?

    MESSENGER

    Four o'clock in the morning.
    HASTINGS Enter

    HASTINGS

    Can’t Lord Stanley sleep?

    MESSENGER

    I guess not—for good reason, as you’ll soon hear. First, he sends his regards.

    HASTINGS

    And then?

    MESSENGER

    And then he said to tell you that tonight he dreamed the duke of Gloucester cut off his helmet—that is, his head. Besides that, he says that two meetings are going to be held tomorrow, and something may be decided at one of them that may make you and him, who are at the other, sorry. He wants to know if instead of going to the meeting, you’ll get on your horse and ride north with him to get out of harm’s way.