• Enter BRUTUS and CASSIUS with the PLEBEIANS

    PLEBEIANS

    We will be satisfied! Let us be satisfied!

    BRUTUS

    Then follow me and give me audience, friends.
    —Cassius, go you into the other street
    And part the numbers.
    5—Those that will hear me speak, let 'em stay here.
    Those that will follow Cassius, go with him,
    And public reasons shall be renderèd
    Of Caesar’s death.

    FIRST PLEBEIAN

        I will hear Brutus speak.

    ANOTHER PLEBEIAN

    I will hear Cassius and compare their reasons
    10When severally we hear them renderèd.
    Exit CASSIUS with some of the PLEBEIANS BRUTUS goes into the pulpit

    THIRD PLEBEIAN

    The noble Brutus is ascended. Silence!

    BRUTUS

    Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! Hear me for my cause, and be silent that you may hear. Believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor that you may believe. Censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar’s, to him I say that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.
  • BRUTUS and CASSIUS enter with a throng of PLEBEIANS .

    PLEBEIANS

    We want answers. Give us answers.

    BRUTUS

    Then follow me and listen to my speech, friends. Cassius, go to the next street and divide the crowd. Let those who will hear me speak stay. Lead those away who will follow you, and we’ll explain publicly the reasons for Caesar’s death.

    FIRST PLEBEIAN

    I’ll listen to Brutus.

    SECOND PLEBEIAN

    I’ll listen to Cassius, and we will compare their reasons.
    CASSIUS exits with some of the PLEBEIANS. BRUTUS gets up on the platform.

    THIRD PLEBEIAN

    Quiet! Noble Brutus has mounted the platform.

    BRUTUS

    Be patient until I finish. Romans, countrymen, and friends! Listen to my reasons and be silent so you can hear. Believe me on my honor and keep my honor in mind, so you may believe me. Be wise when you criticize me and keep your minds alert so you can judge me fairly. If there’s anyone in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar’s, I say to him that my love for Caesar was no less than his. If, then, that friend demands to know why I rose up against Caesar, this is my answer: it’s not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.