• Enter CAESAR, AGRIPPA, THIDIAS, and DOLABELLA, with others

    CAESAR

    Let him appear that’s come from Antony.
    Know you him?

    DOLABELLA

                                    Caesar, ’tis his schoolmaster—
    An argument that he is plucked, when hither
    He sends so poor a pinion of his wing,
    5Which had superfluous kings for messengers
    Not many moons gone by.
    Enter AMBASSADOR from Antony

    CAESAR

                                                         Approach and speak.

    AMBASSADOR

    Such as I am, I come from Antony.
    I was of late as petty to his ends
    As is the morn-dew on the myrtle leaf
    10To his grand sea.

    CAESAR

                                      Be ’t so. Declare thine office.

    AMBASSADOR

    Lord of his fortunes he salutes thee, and
    Requires to live in Egypt; which not granted,
    He lessens his requests, and to thee sues
    To let him breathe between the heavens and earth
    15A private man in Athens. This for him.
    Next, Cleopatra does confess thy greatness,
    Submits her to thy might, and of thee craves
    The circle of the Ptolemies for her heirs,
    Now hazarded to thy grace.
  • CAESAR, AGRIPPA, THIDIAS, and DOLABELLA enter, with others of the court.

    CAESAR

    Let the envoy from Antony come in. Do you know him?

    DOLABELLA

    It’s Antony’s schoolmaster. By sending such an insignificant emissary, Antony shows us how low he has sunk. Not so long ago, he had so many royal supporters that he sent along extra kings as messengers.
    Antony’s AMBASSADOR enters.

    CAESAR

    Come forward and speak.

    AMBASSADOR

    Humble as I am, I represent Antony. Until recently, I was as unimportant to his affairs as the morning dew is to the wide ocean.

    CAESAR

    So be it. Say what you’re here for.

    AMBASSADOR

    He acknowledges that you are the master of his fate, and he requests to be allowed to live in Egypt. If that is not granted, he reduces his requests and asks only that he be allowed to live as a private man in Athens. That’s all he asks for himself. Cleopatra recognizes your greatness and accepts your authority. She only asks that the crown of Egypt pass to her heirs, who are now at your mercy.